Brady visits Walker’s, discusses pandemic and nationwide demonstrations

Posted 6/22/20

Congressman Kevin Brady made a stop at Walker’s Cafe in Madisonville Monday to meet with constituents and discuss the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as other issues currently facing Texas and the nation.

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Brady visits Walker’s, discusses pandemic and nationwide demonstrations

Posted

Congressman Kevin Brady made a stop at Walker’s Cafe in Madisonville Monday to meet with constituents and discuss the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic as well as other issues currently facing Texas and the nation.

Brady acknowledged an uptick of COVID-19 cases as a whole in Texas, but assured attendees of the state’s progress throughout the process.

“We have a bit of a challenge right now in some of our Texas counties,” said Brady. “To put it in perspective, do not just follow the infection rate or hospitalization. I worry most about making sure people do not lose their lives. When it comes to the death rates, Texas is 23 times safer than New York state. We are twice as safe as the next state closest to us (California), so we are doing it in a positive way.”

As the top Republican member on the House Ways and Means Committee, Brady was instrumental in passing the CARES Act in March, which provided $600 a week in supplemental unemployment benefits to provide support and economic relief for workers who lost their jobs or have been unable to work due to the pandemic.

Congress has also devoted a large sum to finding a vaccine for the coronavirus, which Brady stated could come by the end of the year.

“There is a good chance, experts say, that we will have a vaccine for the virus by November or December,” said Brady.

Brady also touched on a bill he introduced in June called the Reopening America by Supporting Workers and Businesses Act of 2020. The bill aims to help local businesses rebuild their workforce quickly by turning said unemployment benefits into a back-to-work bonus that will provide a bump to workers and help accelerate the economic recovery.

“Through a Return To Work Bonus, which would allow workers to keep up to two weeks of unemployment benefits if they accept a job offer, we can make sure these temporary job losses don’t turn into permanent ones,” said Brady when the bill was initially proposed. “We need these workers. Unless we can reconnect these workers with these Main Street businesses soon, that business may no longer be there. This proposal is an important part in preventing a prolonged recession.”

The Congressman also weighed in on the death of George Floyd, an African American man who was killed in May while in police custody in Minneapolis. Brady began by condemning the acts of the officers involved.

“I think the whole country is unified in condemning (Floyd’s) death,” said Brady. “It was wrong, it was horrific, it should never have happened and these folks need to be held accountable. We all want justice for Mr. Floyd’s family. We want the bad apples kept out of law enforcement and kept out. But we also want to make sure we do not do something dangerous like defunding our police and law enforcement. In fact, we ought to do just the opposite. We need to invest more in training and recruiting.”

He also stated he has met with a number of local law enforcement officials as well as African American pastors.

“You would be surprised and encouraged by how much they all agree on the same thing,” said Brady. “Which is we want to recruit the best, keep them and train them up. We also want the bad apples out of the system.”

In closing, Brady acknowledged the importance of differentiating between peaceful protesters and other individuals who have taken to rioting and looting in the aftermath of Floyd’s killing.

“We need to support the peaceful protesters who are doing right,” said Brady. “But then there are those who are violent and attacking small businesses and communities, who are attacking law enforcement. We are seeing police shot on Facebook Live, stabbed, run over and poisoned. We cannot have this because law enforcement is looking out for everyone in our communities.”

He referenced an executive order passed last week by President Donald Trump which incentives police reforms and higher training as an example of common sense responses he hopes to continue seeing in Washington.

“At the end of the day, nobody should be judged by the color of their skin, or by the uniform they wear,” said Brady.

Brady was introduced by Kevin Counsil, Chairman of the Madison County Republican Party. Other notable attendees included Madison County Judge Tony Leago, Madisonville Mayor Bill Parten and Madison County Sheriff candidate Bobby Adams.

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