Coronavirus sneaks into county

Staff Reports
Posted 4/15/20

The first confirmed case of COVID-19, also known as the novel coronavirus, hit Madison County Thursday, and other cases are reportedly appearing.

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Coronavirus sneaks into county

Posted

The first confirmed case of COVID-19, also known as the novel coronavirus, hit Madison County Thursday, and other cases are reportedly appearing.

A report of a positive test in the City of Madisonville could not be confirmed as of Tuesday morning.

The first case, identified by county officials as a woman of 40-50 years of age, living in Midway, was not hospitalized, but is self-quarantining at home.

According to Madison County Emergency Management Coordinator Shelly Butts, as of Tuesday morning, there were 20 tests for the virus initiated in the county, with three pending. All other tests so far have not detected the presence of COVID-19.

“We do not know if these people being tested are Madison County residents, and we do not know how many Madison County residents are being tested outside of our county,” Butts said via e-mail. “Please know that tests for residents of other counties do not count as an official Madison County case.”

As part of ongoing efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus, both Madison County and the City of Madisonville issued curfew orders Monday. Other than essential business, residents should be in their homes from 11:59 p.m. each night to 5 a.m. the next morning.

According to Butts, the Brazos Valley Council of Governments has been working on a plan for an alternate care site that could house near 250 patients.

“They are working through the details of locating a facility, utilizing tents if needed, getting the necessary supplies, and staffing, if needed,” she said. The council has been working with the medical and emergency management communities daily, reporting available hospital bed counts, ICU bed counts, and ventilators available, Butts said.

“As of information from this past week, for example, area hospitals were at an combined 44% on bed occupancy, 67% on ICU bed occupancy, and 32% ventilator occupancy one day. These numbers change daily and are constantly being monitored and adjusted in a group effort. They are being used for planning across the region, as these facilities work together constantly,” Butts said.

Statewide, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services, there have been 14,624 cases of the virus in Texas, resulting in 318 fatalities. There are currently 13 confirmed COVID-19 patients hospitalized in the defined area that includes Madison County and College Station.

As of Monday, there were 293 beds available in the region.

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