County taps history to name planned loop

Posted 11/26/19

The planned loop around the southern side of Madisonville will carry a name with a bit of history, thanks to Madison county commissioners, who approved a resolution Monday to christen the roadway as State Highway 1853.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

County taps history to name planned loop

Posted

The planned loop around the southern side of Madisonville will carry a name with a bit of history, thanks to Madison county commissioners, who approved a resolution Monday to christen the roadway as State Highway 1853.

“That’s when Madison County came to be,” said County Judge Tony Leago.

According to the Texas Historical Commission, Madison County was indeed formed from Grimes, Walker, and Leon counties on Jan. 27, 1853 and organization followed on Aug. 7, 1854.

Leago noted that the proposed bypass has received funding and passed through most other hurdles. All that was left was giving the road a name and the actual construction.

“You’ve got the naming rights, if you want them,” he told commissioners.

TxDOT plans for the loop to stretch from FM 1452, then circling around to rejoin State Highway 21 some 400-500 yards past Buc-Ee’s. The project will not begin until after completion of the Highway 21 widening project, or around 2025. TxDOT held a public meeting Nov. 12 at the Truman Kimbro Convention Center in Madisonville to get public input on the southern relief route, one of the final steps to approval.

The proposed project would provide two 12-foot wide travel lanes in each direction separated by a grassy median. Travel lanes would be bounded by four-foot wide inside and 10-foot wide outside shoulders, creating a proposed right-of-way along the route between 250 and 500 feet wide. The loop would have ramps to access SH 90 and SH75, and a new bridge over Interstate 45.

In other moves Monday, commissioners approved spending $8,520 to upgrade voting equipment with new kiosks designed to ease the process of verifying voter information by poll workers and provide more privacy for voters.

“This will include a field-station laptop, a label printer, card reader that use to check drivers’ license and a new signature pad,” said Janet Boone an election judge who will become the county’s elections administrator on Monday.

The signature pad syncs with the laptop, so voters will be able to see their information on the signature pad to ensure accuracy. In past elections, poll workers would have to verbally confirm the information, including which party primary a voter wished to participate.

“A lot of people didn’t like having to say that information out loud,” Boone said.

Commissioners also approved a higher salary range for certain county workers Monday, raising the cap on pay grades 9 and 10 by 3.25% and 0.26%, respectively, to correct an issue regarding employee salaries falling outside of previously approved ranges.

In their previous regular meeting, Commissioners voted to cap the maximum salary range for county positions, rather than the automatic adjustment of prior years to match the pay increase for county employees. According to County Auditor Toni Joyner, one or two senior employees would exceed the maximum range for their positions if they receive the 4% increase agreed upon, though contentiously, during the 2020 budgeting process.

With the cap on the upper salary range, Joyner told commissioners, they would have to make decisions on those people’s salaries or titles after more information was gathered.

The adjustments made Monday solve that problem.

Comments