County to consider joining 2nd amendment sanctuary list

Posted 12/10/19

Madison County Commissioners will consider Dec. 23 joining a swiftly growing group of Texas counties establishing themselves as “Second Amendment sanctuaries.”

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County to consider joining 2nd amendment sanctuary list

Posted

Madison County Commissioners will consider Dec. 23 joining a swiftly growing group of Texas counties establishing themselves as “Second Amendment sanctuaries.”

Discussion was originally planned for Monday’s regular meeting of the County Commissioners Court, but the agenda item was tabled for the next meeting for a change in wording requested by the county resident who originally proffered the proposal.

“There was just some different wording the individual wanted,” said County Judge Tony Leago. Leago was unable to recall the name of the resident who extended the suggestion to the county. Other county officials contacted were also unable to name the author of the proposal.

Edwards County in southwest Texas was the first to declare itself a second amendment sanctuary county in June 2018, but the trend has really picked up since Hudspeth County in far west Texas passed its measure in March. Since then, 24 of the 254 counties in the state have passed such policies, as well as the towns of Big Spring and Chester.

Nearby Montgomery and Waller counties passed second amendment sanctuary resolutions in late November. According to reports, Navarro, Brown, Coleman, and McCulloch counties passed gun sanctuary measures Monday.

The number of counties passing such resolutions has risen dramatically since then-presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke during an October debate, “hell yes, we're going to take your AR-15, your AK-47.”

Such measures usually codify that a county and its resources will not be used to enforce “unconstitutional firearms restrictions” against citizens. Most also block the use of county funds, employees and buildings from being used in service of any law that restricts the right to keep and bear arms.

Such efforts have not passed every time they’ve ended up on an agenda, however. In Jeff Davis County, commissioners killed voting on a similar proposal in August, after receiving legal guidance, according to a story in the Big Bend Sentinel.

James Allison, general counsel for the County Judges and Commissioners Association of Texas, told the Commissioners Court in a written opinion that “Texas counties have no authority to create a ‘sanctuary’ for or against weapons,” according to the newspaper.

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