Historic rodeo returns for 38th year

Posted 9/24/19

Since 1981, Glover’s Rodeo has attracted a number of cowboys and cowgirls throughout the community despite moving from Madisonville to Hearne in 2002. The location may have changed, but the family atmosphere and passion for rodeo has remained the same since Melvin Glover first had the vision 38 years ago.

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Historic rodeo returns for 38th year

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Since 1981, Glover’s Rodeo has attracted a number of cowboys and cowgirls throughout the community despite moving from Madisonville to Hearne in 2002. The location may have changed, but the family atmosphere and passion for rodeo has remained the same since Melvin Glover first had the vision 38 years ago.

“It is a beautiful family-oriented gathering,” said Melva Glover, Melvin’s daughter and manager of the rodeo. “It is like a big party and there is one grand finale. I was entertained and I am happy that I was because that is what a good rodeo is about. It is not about one people or one race, it is about everyone that it took to achieve that common goal and we did it. I am happy and proud.”

Attendance dipped slightly when the rodeo was first moved to Hearne, but they have built the same following over the last two decades and still welcome many of the same faces from the Madisonville community.

“As things grew over the 20 years, it came to be the same old Glover’s Rodeo that we had in Madisonville,” said Melva. “At this time, we have been successful in Hearne and they have rallied behind us. That is something to be proud of.”

Melva can remember learning the ways of the lifestyle from Melvin, now 75, during and prior to the early days of the rodeo. Her father lost his right arm at the age of 18 but remained an ardent supporter of what has become a legacy for the family. She has been active in rodeo activities since she was four-years-old and has only passed that love on to her children.

“We love the rodeo life and we love to go on the road,” said Melva. “My kids could have gone any direction, but the rodeo is part of who we are. The majority of the people in the arena have blood ties, so they know each other and they work very well together.”

But the influence has clearly grown beyond one single family or community. Prior to Saturday’s main event, numerous spectators in the crowd proudly proclaimed their hometown at the host’s request. People came from Madison County, Huntsville, Houston, Dallas and even San Antonio — just to name a few — to witness the show. Some even came from miles away despite the fact that they were dealing with tragic circumstances because of the weather.

“Some people lost everything, but they still made it to the rodeo,” said Melva. “I can remember as a little girl, someone would break down on the highway and someone else would hitch them to their trailer and pull them along to the rodeo.”

The first ever Glover’s Rodeo was modestly held in a local cemetery in 1981 due to the efforts of Melvin and has since grown into the highly anticipated spectacle it is today. The events were held at the Robertson Fairgrounds. The activities during the two day event included a midnight “glow” trail ride on Friday, ‘old-timer’ and youth roping on Saturday morning and the grand event on Saturday evening.

Glover’s Rodeo officials would like to thank all of the sponsors and support they received for the event, including Henson Family Dealerships, Drake’s Towing and Service Center, Los Ranchos and Easterling Veterinary Services.

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