MCISD board reviews TAPR

Posted 1/14/20

The Madisonville Consolidated Independent School District (MCISD) held their monthly meeting for January Monday and reviewed the district’s Texas Academic Performance Report (TAPR), which was released in December.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

MCISD board reviews TAPR

Posted

The Madisonville Consolidated Independent School District (MCISD) held their monthly meeting for January Monday and reviewed the district’s Texas Academic Performance Report (TAPR), which was released in December.

Every year, the report pulls together a variety of information regarding the performance of each school district’s students. The performance is broken down into groups including ethnicity and socioeconomic status. They also provide extensive information on district staff, programs and demographics.

The district received an ‘A’ rating in overall accountability. The report was based off data from the 2018-19 school year.

“The TAPR report is basically the big report that pulls everything together that we have already seen,” said Assistant Superintendent Keith West. “There is no new information. It gives you a deeper dive into how the district performed by grade level.”

The district earned a number of distinctions at the elementary, intermediate and junior high campuses and improved in academics as well as the College, Career and Military Readiness portion at the high school level.

“We have a great administrative team and faculty and our children benefit because of it,” said Superintendent Keith Smith. “When you are an ‘A’ with the demographic make up that we have, it is tough to move up. It is tough to move up when your rating is that high anyway.”

The best way MCISD can continue to move up is by improving at the Met Grade Level standard category as well as improving reading scores.

The data provided breaks down specific student scores, allowing educators to determine how close they were to improving in specific categories.

“What you find so often is a kid who may have missed hitting that Met Grade Level standard by one question,” said West. “If we know that, there are a lot of things that can be done to motivate that kid. There is an ability to break it down so you are fighting for inches instead of miles and we are seeing growth.”

Comments