Runs in the family

Sister squad slows its speeders

Posted 1/7/20

Four Madisonville locals ages eight and under have taken safety and community wellness into their own hands by urging vehicles on Morris Street to travel no faster than the posted 30 mph as well as picking up litter throughout the surrounding areas.

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Runs in the family

Sister squad slows its speeders

Posted

Four Madisonville locals ages eight and under have taken safety and community wellness into their own hands by urging vehicles on Morris Street to travel no faster than the posted 30 mph as well as picking up litter throughout the surrounding areas.

Savannah Ogle (8), Kammie McVeay (8), Addison Ogle (7) and Chelsea Kate Ogle (4) have patrolled the area outside the Morris Street residence at least once a week for the last two months after noticing an unwelcome amount of speeding in front of the home.

“We were sitting outside one day, looking at cars, and we saw one going really fast,” said McVeay. “We decided to get the whistles and vests and we started blowing the whistles at cars that were going too fast.”

Savannah, Addison and Chelsea Kate are all daughters of Sergeant Tyler Ogle of the Madison County Sheriff’s Department. As a community law enforcement officer, Ogle knows how difficult it can be for small town officers to constantly enforce speed limits on each individual section of the town.

As a proud father, Ogle assisted the children in their safety crusade by providing them with a speed radar gun to ensure that they would only use their whistles to alert drivers traveling over 30 mph down the narrow roadway, which runs parallel to Main Street near Madisonville Consolidated School District.

“This was absolutely their idea, they got the vests out and wanted to do it,” said Sgt. Ogle. “I just gave them the radar gun. As they have done it, they realized just how fast people travel down this road. We have actually been bike riding down the road and have almost been hit a few times.”

While the children came up with the idea on their own, they still credit Sgt. Ogle for being part of the motivation that inspired them to make a difference.

“It was actually our dad because he is a police officer,” said Savannah Ogle. “We wanted to be like him. Once, when we were doing this, he brought us a speed detector. We just started using that from then on.”

The girls have recently taken it one step farther by designing their own speeding tickets, which were created using looseleaf notebook paper. The messages on the tickets read, ‘Ticket for going too fast, from police officer.’

“We decided instead of screaming we could write a sign and I thought that we could write tickets, too,” said Chelsea Kate Ogle. “So if some cars do stop, we could give them tickets for going too fast.”

A handful of cars have already stopped or slowed to at least inquire to what the girls were doing on the street with whistles, vests and a radar gun. One member of the community slowed to tell the girls it was a “really good idea.”

The girls have not stopped there in their effort to improve the look of the community in which they live. They have also patrolled the neighborhood with buckets in hand in an effort to clean up all of the trash they could find. This clean-up tradition is continued from their prior residence before moving to Madisonville.

“We did it when we were at our old house, too,” said Addison Ogle on their trash pickup system. “We started picking up trash in our yard and that is how it all started.”

“Absolutely their idea, too,” said Sgt. Ogle. “They had a really good time (cleaning up trash at the previous residence) and saw that it made a difference. It gives them a positive outlook on giving back and they really enjoy that.”

The four girls will continue their work in an effort to make their little sliver of Madisonville a better place. Residents traveling down Morris Street would be wise to keep this in mind as they will be tracking the speed of vehicles that cross their path.

The girls also expressed interest in a possible career in law enforcement in the future, just like Sgt. Ogle, who is the father of three of the four children involved.

“They take what I do and bring it to a childlike state,” said Sgt. Ogle. “It is all innocent and it is just amazing, even at their young age, what they are able to see as a possible problem and danger to them while they are out there. I hope to think that I maybe played a little part in it. Hopefully it just builds that foundation. It is a good thing to do for the community, wherever you live.”

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