City mulls ordinance targeting ‘rogue’ parking signs

Posted 10/20/20

The city of Madisonville is taking aim at certain private reserved parking signs at businesses around town, especially around the downtown square. The signs, intended to reserve street parking for customers, are sometimes erected on the sidewalk, which is city property.

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City mulls ordinance targeting ‘rogue’ parking signs

Posted

The city of Madisonville is taking aim at certain private reserved parking signs at businesses around town, especially around the downtown square. The signs, intended to reserve street parking for customers, are sometimes erected on the sidewalk, which is city property.

At the behest of Madisonville police chief Herbert Gilbert and code enforcement officer Don Grooms, the Madisonville City Council will mull a new ordinance that takes aim at removing “rogue” signs from businesses.

The signs carry no authority, as there are no parking restrictions in the city.

“On city streets, you’re allowed to park anywhere you want to, unless it’s a handicap space,” Gilbert said at the regular meeting of the Madisonville City Council Oct. 13. The regular meeting was delayed from it’s normal second Monday of the month due to the Columbus Day holiday.

“(The signs are) a bit of a bluff to the average driver,” Gilbert said. “They’re not enforceable, but they are a deterrent.”

Gilbert and Grooms asked council members to consider a future ordinance regarding the parking signs and their placement, though noted that those located on city sidewalks already run afoul of the law.

“Because they’re on city property, I should be able to go ask them tomorrow to take them down,” Grooms noted.

But he and Gilbert urged council members to mull a direct ordinance against the signs and will work this month to develop a draft for consideration.

In other moves, council members approved a resolution to join a coalition of cities asking the state to allow the use of hotel tax revenue for improvement in city parks, something already allowed in larger cities.

“It’s the mid-sized cities that need this,” said Madisonville City Manager Camilla Viator. “Fredricksburg is leading this charge.”

The council also approved seeking $6 million in grants for drainage improvements around the city.

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